Bribery, Corruption Also

Bribery, Corruption Also

H. R. F. Keating

$10.99

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Description

Inspector Ghote, 'one of the great creations of detective fiction' (Alexander McCall Smith), accompanies his wife to Calcutta to take charge of an unexpected legacy and encounters corruption, conspiracy . . . and murder, in this classic mystery - with a brand-new introduction by bestselling author Vaseem Khan. Inspector Ganesh Ghote of the Bombay CID is not a happy man. His wife has inherited an estate in Calcutta - and she is determined that they both move from his beloved Bombay to live a life of luxurious retirement there. But when the couple travel to the noisy but vibrant city to view her legacy, they find their property inhabited by hostile squatters and in a terrible state of disrepair. Their lawyer, A.K. Dutt-Dastar, suggests they sell immediately, but Ghote, suspicious when he discovers there is already someone eager to buy the decaying ruin, detects a whiff of corruption and digs in his heels. Who has the most to gain from swindling Protima, Ghote's beloved wife? There's no shortage of suspects, but as the dogged detective investigates, he runs into corrupt figures at every level. Soon, it's clear that his investigations have the potential to put both himself and Protima in very great danger . . .


Author

H. R. F. Keating:
H. R. F. Keating, known as Harry to his family and friends, was born in St Leonards-on-Sea, Sussex, in 1926. He was educated at Merchant Taylors School in London and Trinity College, Dublin, before training as a journalist. As well as publishing over sixty books in his lifetime, Keating was the crime fiction reviewer for The Times for fifteen years and held many prestigious roles, including Chairman of the Society of Authors and President of the Detection Club. Keating's first novel about Inspector Ghote, The Perfect Murder, won the Gold Dagger of the Crime Writers Association and an Edgar Allen Poe Special Award, and was later made into a film by Merchant Ivory. He subsequently won many more awards, including the CWA's Cartier Diamond Dagger for outstanding services to crime literature. He lived in London with his wife, the actor Sheila Mitchell, until his death in 2011, aged eighty-four.

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